The plan: walk as far as we could toward the caves below.

We had no intention of getting to them. The steps were far too steep for us. We may get to the bottom, but we didn’t believe we would ever get back out and there we would sit, making our lives at bottom of the ravine.

Maybe we could open a taco stand? Sell sustenance to the others that had made their way down, only watch them lithely clamber back up the path and those treacherous steps after partaking of our hard work.

I can just see the sorry looks on their faces as they pity bought our delicious tacos. Oh these poor people, stuck at the bottom of a ravine! The humanity!

We’d make up a story about how we had traveled down and seeing how beautiful and rich in resources it was, we decided to make it our home.

Taking a startled look around, they’d start to wonder. Resources? Say… how do you get the ingredients for these wonderful tacos? Someone would eventually ask.

We’d take a sly look at each other and smile. Yes. Locally sourced, of course.

Those silly people would slowly chew the last bite of their “delicious” tacos, or stop chewing altogether and think… wait a minute. Locally sourced what?

In the distant past, a wandering cow may have found its way up the ravine, but certainly not a chicken or a pig. And since the area was made into a park, there were no more cattle. So what kind of meat IS this?

And what about tortillas? Lettuce? Tomatoes? What kind of salsa is this?

A little late to ask now, we would giggle to ourselves as we stacked the bodies up in our “cold storage” for later use.

And there we sat at the end of the evening, another days work done, a modern myth created and maintained.